Home > childhood, poetry > “The School Dance”

“The School Dance”

I was planning on writing a piece on persuasion after reading an interesting article on the subject in Scientific American Mind and another on NPR but I am to bushed. I trimmed up the tree in the front yard, used a chainsaw for the first time, and everything. I chickened out from climbing around in it sawing off the dead branches. Instead I tied some rope to a hammer and lassoed the dead branches like I was hanging a bear bag (when you camp you have to hang your food at least 12′ to keep the bears out of it) and then pulled them down. Dad was impressed, didn’t know i had that skill set. So when I want to post but don’t feel like writing its time to post another poem from the past. This one I wrote in that first flurry of school shootings, prior to Columbine. I can’t relate to the desire to commit random violence but I can relate to feeling left out and alone.

Luke Woodham shot some kids at Pearl High

Don’t ask me who, don’t ask me why

Kids got it hard, this is true

Deadbeat Dads and sniffing glue

Luke stabbed his mom or so they say

What a way to start your day

The newspapers say Satan’s to blame

But I know it was cuz he never came

To The School Dance

The School Dance was really Rockin’

After wards all the kids were talkin’

Who you gotta know and what you gotta do

If you want to try… to be cool.

Luke Woodham’s a killer yes I know

But what can you do? Where can you go?

Stuck in a house with a Mom you hate

And there’s no way you’ll get a date

To The School Dance.

The School Dance was really Rockin’

Afterwards all the kids were talkin’

Who you gotta know and what you gotta do

If you want to try… to be cool.

Luke Woodham will spend his life in jail

With no parole, no chance for bail

He was wrong for what he did

Cuz now there’s gonna be two less kids

At The Scho0l Dance.

The School Dance was really Rockin’

Afterwards all the kids were talkin’

What you gotta know, and who you gotta do

If you wanna try… to be cool.

Categories: childhood, poetry
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